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20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
>>> we are just four days away from the end of the most expensive election season in the history of the country. with more than $350 million spent on ballot measures in california alone. and voter registration in the state has hit an all-time high with 18 million now on the rolls. who are the now voters and what are their interests and concerns? plus, a million giant fan faithf faithfuls hit the streets to celebrate their world series sweep. coming up next. >>> hello, i'm belva davis and welcome to "this week in northern california." joining me on the news panel tonight, josh richman, regional political reporter for the bay area news group. carla marin you've cci, "san francisco chronicle." and odette keeley, new america media anchor and executive producer. and in sacramento, john myers, kxtv news 10, political editor. well, this campaign season has been marked by massive amounts of spending from outside groups, yet, with all of the money spent and all of the people who paid attention, the race for president remains too close to call. and here in california, we're feeling the aff
edition of "this week in northern california." with the november election just around the corner, the campaigns are heating up for propositions 30 and 38. tonight, we want to cut through the noise and try to make sense of what really is at stake for schools if one or both or neither get the green light. we'll hear from both sides in just a few minutes. plus, get some in depth analysis from two veteran education reporters. but first, we wanted to see just how bad the budget situation is in our schools. and how it got that way in the first place. pbs news hour correspondent spencer michaels takes a look. >> in schools around the state, there's a feeling that the ax is about to fall. and if and when it does, san francisco school superintendent will have to act. >> we have our doomsday plan. part of that is lopping days off of the school year. and it can be up to ten days next year. that's two weeks off of the school year. >> richard caranza says his district, though well supported by voter-passed bond measures and parcel taxes, has suffered as the state's economy tanked and, along w
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)